Dashboards - Public - Geothermal Co-Production

Introduction

CanGEA is proud to announce that, in partnership with Alberta Economic Development and Trade and our members, Enerpro Engineering, WellDunn Consulting, Non-Linear Consulting and Fuzeium Innovations, every Albertan oil and gas well as of October 31, 2016 has been assessed for geothermal potential. This study was conducted to identify locations that Alberta can deploy its oil and gas expertise for renewable energy, and the results suggest that the opportunity set is vast.    Source: CanGEA - Jun 19, 2017 - Press Release

How to Use This Dashboard?
What is GeoThermal?
What is Co-Production?
How Can We Use Geothermal Energy?
In its simplest terms, geothermal means earth-heat. It is related to the thermal energy of Earth’s interior. On a large scale, the intensity of this thermal energy increases with depth, that is, the temperature of the Earth increases as we travel closer to its centre. A global average for Earth’s geothermal gradient (temperature increase with depth) is approximately 30°C/km. For example, if we merely removed the outer 3 km of Earth’s outer surface, it would be a sphere 5,000°C at the core, and nearly hot enough to boil water on its surface. Earth contains an incredibly vast amount of thermal energy. This heat is used in a geothermal power plant to drive a steam turbine, which creates electricity. Any leftover heat can also be used in a variety of industrial heating applications.

Source: CanGEA - Geothermal 101

Co-production offers a sustainable "turn key" conversion of existing Oil and Gas drilling infrastructure by utilizing the hot production water resources already at surface as part of hydrocarbon extraction. It offers well owners and operators a holistic approach for harnessing and selling various forms of energy while diversifying their revenue streams and creating new jobs.

Source: CanGEA - Co-Production Webinar

By using Earth’s thermal energy to heat water instead of processes with harmful by-products like coal and nuclear, geothermal energy can produce clean, reliable electricity as long as heat continues to seep from Earth’s interior (as it has for 4.5 billion years). Further, it is sustainable power because once we have extracted the thermal energy from the water or steam, it can be continuously re-injected deep underground to obtain more geothermal heat.

Aside from producing power, we also use hot, geothermal water for heating pools (i.e. hot springs), district heating, agriculture and laundries, to name a few. This is called direct-use geothermal because the heat is used directly from the water to serve a function.

Source: CanGEA - Geothermal 101

How to...

Want to see more?  Explore the 3 use cases from the study.